Chapter 5 : Sensory, Attentional and Perceptional Processes - Important Questions and Answers

List of Questions and Answers

1.When we go to a matinee show, on entering the theatre we find it difficult to see things around. However, after spending about 15-20 minutes there, we are able to see almost everything. What is this phenomenon called?
(Chapter 5 - Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans:visual adaptation.

2.Artist mostly use ___________________to create an impression of depth on a flat surface.
(Chapter 5 - Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans: Monocular cues

3._________________________help flattens the lens to focus the distant objects.
(Chapter 5 - Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans: ciliary muscles

4.Explain the term Illusion.
(Chapter 5 - Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans: Our perceptions are not always truthful. Sometime we fail to interpret the sensory information correctly. This results in a mismatch between the physical stimuli and its perception. These misperceptions resulting from misinterpretation of information received by our sensory organs are generally known as illusions.
Illusions are are experienced more or less by all of us.
They result from an external stimulus situation and generate the same kind of experience in each individual.Illusions are also called "primitive organisations".

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5.With the help of an example explain Size Constancy.
(Chapter 5 - Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans:

  • The size of an image on our retina changes when the distance of the object from our eye changes.
  • The far it is, the smaller is the image.
  • On the other hand, our experience shows that within limits the object appears to be about the same size irrespective of its distance.
  • This tendency of the size of objects to remain relatively unchanged with changes in their distance from the observer and the size of the retinal image is called size constancy.
An example is, when you approach your friend from a distance, your perception of the friend’s size does not change much despite the fact that the retinal image (image on retina) becomes larger.

6. State three points of difference between Rods and Cones.
(Chapter 5: Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans:

Rods Cones
Rods are the receptors for scotopic vision (night vision). Cones are the receptors for photopic (day light) vision.
They operate at low intensities of light, and lead to achromatic (colourless) vision. They operate at high levels of illumination, and lead to chromatic (colour) vision.
Each eye contains about 100 million rods. Each eye contains about 7 million cones.

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7.The process of organising visual field into meaningful wholes is known as _____________.
(Chapter 5: Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes)

Ans: form perception.

More Questions and Answers Coming Soon.